Biodiversity Research Institute
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Program Director
Amy K. Sauer, M.S., Ph.D. Candidate
Amy extracts a Nashville Warbler from a mist net while conducting research at Spring Pond Bog in New York's Adirondack Park.

Amy K. Sauer, M.S., Ph.D. Candidate

Songbird Program Director
Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation Specialist

207-887-7160 x145
amy.sauer@briloon.org

Amy Sauer has a B.A. in environmental studies, a M.S. in conservation biology, and is a Ph.D. candidate at Syracuse University. She has 13 years of experience monitoring, capturing, and sampling songbirds and Common Loons. She is the director of BRI’s songbird program and works with BRI’s Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation.

Sauer studies the Common Loon and migratory songbirds as wildlife indicator species to assess the effects of mercury deposition on Adirondack ecosystems. She has also designed and implemented studies to evaluate mercury bioaccumulation in Adirondack food webs, including conducting laboratory analysis of songbird tissues, soils, and invertebrate samples to determine their mercury concentrations. 

Her doctoral research focuses on the transfer of mercury through terrestrial food webs to songbird communities inhabiting northern hardwood forests, montane boreal forests, and Sphagnum bog habitats in the Adirondack Park. In addition to field work, she gives public and scientific presentations; prepares reports, publications, and newsletters; and develops and presents school curricula.

Education

 
  • Ph.D. Candidate, Biology, Syracuse University (2014)
  • M.S., Conservation Biology, Antioch University, 2006
  • B.A., Environmental Studies, University of Rochester, 1996

Research Interests

 
  • Assessing the ecological effects of mercury deposition on Common Loon populations and Adirondack aquatic ecosystems
  • Investigating mercury bioaccumulation and exposure patterns within songbird communities and terrestrial foodwebs in the Adirondack Park and across the Northeastern landscape

Journal Articles

 
Biodiversity Research Institute