Scientific Research

Mercury concentrations in fish and wildlife in the U.S. are known to routinely exceed human and wildlife health thresholds. At present, scientists must rely on limited information to understand and quantify the critical linkages among mercury emissions, deposition, environmental response, and potential wildlife and human health concerns. Mercury policy development, implementation, and associated monitoring rely on accurate and neutral science to improve certainty. The Center for Mercury Studies strives to meet those scientific requirements in the following ways:

Scientific Research

BRI continues to play a lead scientific role in understanding the exposure and effects of mercury on wildlife in New England, North America, and around the world. Efforts include compilation of existing data, generation of new data in wildlife and their prey, and communicating those findings to policymakers and landscape managers.

Mercury Monitoring Networks

BRI has been actively working with an expansive group of scientists around the world to develop plans for an effective national mercury monitoring network, with interests to expand relevant templates on a global scale. To that end, the Institute has developed several networks that link research programs and provide an arena for shared methods and data. BRI is a clearinghouse for mercury data in North America and beyond; we currently coordinate the following research and monitoring networks: