Biodiversity Research Institute
Biodiversity Research Institute
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Wildlife Health: Mobile Surgical Unit
Wildlife Health: Mobile Surgical Unit

Mobile Surgical Capabilities

BRI has mobile surgical capabilities that involve anesthetizing avian and mammalian species for surgical procedures such as transmitter implants. The surgical unit consists of a vaporizer, cardiac and respiratory monitoring, sterile technique, and comprehensive pain management. The veterinary team works alongside the BRI biologists and collaborators to affectively capture and implant avian and mammalian species. 

BRI’s veterinary team ensures the best treatment of each surgical candidate and follows IACUC approved protocols for each project. The veterinary team offers the highest standard of veterinary care and works to minimize stress and discomfort of each animal and ensure sterility during each procedure.

Transmitter Implantation

Transmitter Implantation

This surgical unit is mainly used for surgical implanting animals with various transmitters, such as satellite transmitters. Satellite telemetry is used to gain valuable information about the species life cycle, habitat selection, and migration routes. That data can then been applied for different research questions such as tracking migratory routes for disease mitigation, wind energy mortality mitigation, and contaminant monitoring. The results help to fill the gaps in knowledge about these different species for conservation, management, and policy decisions.

Platform transmitting terminals (PTTs) are the most commonly used transmitter. They transmit GPS points in time to track the migratory routes and stopovers of avian species. BRI’s veterinary team implants these transmitters in the body cavity with an antenna that exits dorsally near the tail. General anesthesia is used with local and general analgesics, and sterile surgical technique.

Movements and Health Studies

Movements and Health Studies

BRI’s veterinary team has been involved with several movement and avian health studies. The studies include:

BRI Veterinarians
Collaborators and Funders
 

BRI wishes to thank Dehler Animal Clinic of Westbrook, Maine, for donating services in support of this project.

 
Photo Credits: Header image © BRI-Jonathan Fiely; Surf Scoter © BRI-Jonathan Fiely; Red-throated Loon © BRI-Rick Gray
Biodiversity Research Institute