Biodiversity Research Institute
Biodiversity Research Institute
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Center for Waterbird Studies
Center for Waterbird Studies

Under the Center for Waterbird Studies, BRI has established a variety of taxa-specific programs focused on the scientific study of the biology, ecology, status, management, and conservation of waterbirds.

‘Waterbirds’ encompasses a large group of birds that rely on aquatic habitats for part or all of their annual life cycle, including marine, coastal, and freshwater ecosystems. Given their reliance on these critical habitats, waterbirds can be useful indicators of ecosystem health and viability.

BRI’s Center for Waterbird Studies includes programs that focus on loons, waterfowl, and marine birds (including shorebirds). All of these programs assist state and federal agencies in the capture, banding, sampling, and tracking of waterbirds. Our research findings are generally relayed to decision makers and the general public through reports, management plans, and communications pieces.

The overarching goal of the Center for Waterbird Studies is to develop applied methods that can be used in studies to better understand waterbird ecology and to lessen anthropogenic threats of at-risk populations.
Contaminants

Contaminants

BRI has a long history of studying contaminants, especially in loons, but is involved in documenting the exposure and effects of mercury in many waterbird species across North America.

Movements

Movements

BRI biologists in the Center for Waterbird Studies are highly experienced in the use of a broad range of technologies to track the movements, migrations, and habitat use of waterbird species – from tiny data loggers, such as geolocators, to satellite transmitters.

Monitoring and Distributions

Monitoring and Distributions

We are regularly involved in surveys and monitoring of waterbird species, to inform decision-makers focused on specific issues, as well as broad-scale spatial planning exercises.
 
Photo Credits: Header: Casco Bay Common Eiders © Chris Dwyer. Taxonomic Groups, Harlequin Duck © Tom Reich, shutterstock; Contaminants, Sampling Common Loon © BRI-Vincent Spagnuolo; Movements, Common Loon © Daniel Poleschook; Monitoring and Distributions, Northern Gannet © BRI-Jonathan Fiely
Biodiversity Research Institute